Potbellied Pigs as Pets

The first time you see a tiny potbellied pig, you immediately fall in love; they’re cute, they make little grunting sounds, and they often enjoy horsing around just like a puppy or kitten. While all these things are true, having a potbellied pig can be a lot of work and is not something that should be undertaken lightly.

Penelope

For example, Penelope (pictured here enjoying the sun at Cedar Row) was kept in a small carrying crate for 10 hours a day in an apartment while her guardians were at work. Imagine spending 10 hours a day in a small, cramped carrier where you can barely turn around. She was kept here because she was still  young (only a few months old) and could fit in the carrier; it wasn’t clear what her life would have been like had she reached full size in an apartment. However, her new life at Cedar Row as she recovers will be filled with open space and constant affection.

Potbellied pigs are not suitable for apartments or houses in subdivisions; they can grow to 200 lbs, can become aggressive and destructive when bored (as all animals do when faced with a similar situation), and are often not permitted in these types of residences due to by-law restrictions.

Cedar Row gets numerous calls every month asking if we can take in potbellied pigs or if we know of someone that can.  In fact, we’re taking 4 of them to be fixed this week to help reduce further numbers.

Although they’re cute and can make great companion animals, there’s a right place for them and an apartment or subdivision home isn’t likely the place. For more information on potbellied pigs, please visit pigs4ever.com.

 

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